Micro Coax Pigtail Assemblies

Coax Pigtails are primarily used in internal applications to connect a PC Board based RF device (WiFi radio, Bluetooth, RFID, etc.) to provide a RF connector to the outside of an enclosure. Since most PC Board based connectors are extremely small, these assemblies use small and lightweight coax appropriate for these micro connectors. We have in-stock assemblies for popular connector combinations and can also custom build any connector, cable type, and length combination upon request.

Dealers and OEM's are welcome! Volume discounts are available. We can support high quantity production of stock or custom pigtails. Please inquire if interested.

Begin by choosing the first connector below:

U.FL / MHF / Hirose / IPEX / IPAX

U.FL is a very popular connector for WiFi, Bluetooth, and RFID radios that are housed on MiniPCI boards or directly on motherboards. It is a tiny connector measuring about 2mm in diameter. NOTE: U.FL, MHF, AMC, IPEX, and IPAX are all interchangable names for the U.FL type connector

MC Card

MC Card connectors have a lock-snap mechanism allowing 360-degree rotation and usually have a 50 Ω impedance. They offer broadband capability from DC to 6 GHz. MC Card connectors are most commonly seen on Wi-Fi PCMCIA cards, specifically Lucent and Proxim brands. They were developed in the 1990s.

MCX

MCX (micro coaxial) connectors are coaxial RF connectors developed in the 1980s. They have the same inner contact and insulator dimensions as the SMB connector but are 30% smaller. MCX is standardized in European CECC 22220. They use a snap-on interface and usually have a 50 Ω impedance (occasionally 75 Ω also). They offer broadband capability from DC to 6 GHz.

MMCX

MMCX (micro-miniature coaxial) connectors are coaxial RF connectors similar to MCX but smaller. They conform to the European CECC 22 000 specification. The connectors have a lock-snap mechanism allowing 360-degree rotation and usually have a 50 Ω impedance. They offer broadband capability from DC to 6 GHz. MMCX connectors are most commonly seen on Wi-Fi PCMCIA cards as antenna connectors or as connectors for external GPS antennas on small devices like PDAs or GPS receivers. They were developed in the 1990s.

RP-MMCX

RP-MMCX connectors are the reverse polarity version of the MMCX connector. They are identical with the only difference being that the center pin has a hole directly in the center. The connectors have a lock-snap mechanism allowing 360-degree rotation and usually have a 50 Ω impedance. They offer broadband capability from DC to 6 GHz. RP-MMCX connectors are most commonly seen on Wi-Fi PCMCIA cards as antenna connectors or as connectors for external GPS antennas on small devices like PDAs or GPS receivers. They were developed in the 1990s.

BNC

The BNC connector (Bayonet Neill–Concelman) is a miniature quick connect/disconnect RF connector used for coaxial cable. It features two bayonet lugs on the female connector; mating is achieved with only a quarter turn of the coupling nut.

SMA

SMA (SubMiniature version A) connectors are semi-precision coaxial RF connectors developed in the 1960s as a minimal connector interface for coaxial cable with a screw type coupling mechanism. The connector has a 50 Ω impedance. It is designed for use from DC to 18 GHz. The SMA connector employs a 1/4"-36 thread. The male is equipped with a 0.312" (5/16") hex nut.

RP-SMA

An RP-SMA connector is the reverse polarity version of an SMA connector. This means that the gender of the center pin or jack is reversed. The Reverse Polarity specification is mandated per FCC rules for ISM devices. To determine if your connector is Reverse Polarity check the center pin or jack in relationship to the body of the connector. A Reverse Polarity Male has a male body (threads on the inside) and a female jack (hole). A Reverse Polarity Female will have a female body (threads on the outside) and a Male center pin.

TNC

The TNC (threaded Neill–Concelman) connector is a threaded version of the BNC connector. The connector has a 50 Ω impedance and operates best in the 0–11 GHz frequency spectrum. It has better performance than the BNC connector at microwave frequencies. Invented in the late 1950s and named after Paul Neill of Bell Labs and Carl Concelman of Amphenol, the TNC connector has been employed in a wide range of radio and wired applications.

RP-TNC

An RP-TNC connector is the reverse polarity version of an TNC connector. This means that the gender of the center pin or jack is reversed. The Reverse Polarity specification is mandated per FCC rules for ISM devices. To determine if your connector is Reverse Polarity check the center pin or jack in relationship to the body of the connector. A Reverse Polarity Male has a male body (threads on the inside) and a female jack (hole). A Reverse Polarity Female will have a female body (threads on the outside) and a Male center pin.

OTHER CONNECTOR

OTHER

If the connector you need was not listed, don't worry! Please contact us with your requirements.

Content Credit: Some connector descriptions obtained from Wikipedia.